The Year in Clinical Sexuality, 2011

The Year in Clinical Sexuality, 2011

 December 26, 2011 As we get ready to leave 2011 behind, I would like as always to express my gratitude to family, friends and colleagues for your support and encouragement over the past year; and to my patients for your trust and confidence.   May we all merit much happiness in 2012. Here’s my list of 2011’s most interesting happenings in clinical sexuality and related disciplines. Vampire Lovemaking This year, in Twilight:  Breaking Dawn Part 1, Bella finally consummated her relationship with Edward, after three years of cinematic foreplay — and immediately ended up pregnant.  By the end of the movie, she’d become both a mom and a vampire.    Shows what can happen. In SexualityToday at the Movies:  Breaking Dawn, we continued the discussion of the “integrative” aspect of ordinary female desire that we began in Twilight and the Art of Foreplay and in The Nine Rooms of Happiness:  What Does a Woman Want? Elsewhere on the paranormal sexuality front, The NY Times Magazine featured a cover story on the new MTV series Teen Wolf —  “We Are All Teenage Werewolves.”  In Wolf Love in the New York Times, I discussed how the human-to-werewolf transformation works as a metaphor for sexual arousal — especially its primal, selfish aspect. Australian writer Katherine Feeney picked up on the idea in Unleashing the Animal Within.  And Cosmo ended up interviewing me for an article in the December issue entitled “The Fierce Sex Every Couple Should Try.”    Shows what can happen.   What Can Google Teach Us About Sexual Motivation? This year saw the publication of A Billion Wicked Thoughts, an interesting report on what must be the world’s largest...
The Year in Clinical Sexuality, 2010

The Year in Clinical Sexuality, 2010

As we get ready to close the books on 2010, I would like to express my gratitude to  family,  friends, and colleagues for your support and encouragement over the past year.   And to all my patients for your trust and confidence.   May we all merit much happiness in 2011. In ending the year,  here’s my rundown of 2010’s most blog-worthy events in the field of clinical sexuality     New Books and Other Happenings Sex at Dawn, the breakout volume by the previously-unknown writing team of Christopher Ryan and Cacilda Jetha, took a sledgehammer to conventional evolutionary sexual psychology  (See my interview with lead author Chris Ryan).   Some thought Sex at Dawn might help promote a more relaxed, European-style attitude towards non-monogamy in America.  In “Will Sex at Dawn influence sex therapy?” I argued that this was probably wishful thinking. This summer,  SEC staffers were caught surfing porn at work. In my blog,  “Men and Their Computers, Alone Together,” I wondered whether the traditional Jewish laws of Yichud might be applicable to whether a man should ever be alone with his computer, unsupervised.  I also contributed a piece to an Italian magazine on workplace infidelity – and how to avoid it. In “Contemporary Sexuality and the Brazilian Wax,” we discussed the modern disappearance of young adult women’s genital hair — and in the process had a dialog with Kinsey researcher Dr Debra Herbenick on the subject. A new book, The Nine Rooms of Happiness, sought to teach women the occult male art of compartmentalization.  I reviewed it, and also briefly interviewed my 9-year-old daughter (she’s since turned 10) on the subject of “What Does a...
The latest news about premature ejaculation

The latest news about premature ejaculation

April 16,  2010 The latest news about premature ejaculation has come in from Europe:  PRNewswire’s   “Men slow to talk about fast sex”.    It cites data from a new survey on PE, which confirmed something that we sex therapists have always known:   Premature ejaculation is a serious matter that adversely affects millions of men’s lives, and the lives of their partners. The study being reported evidently surveyed thousands of men and women to reach this important conclusion. But it wasn’t really news at all to anyone familiar with PE. What was news was that the study was sponsored by a pharmaceutical company:   Janssen-Cilag, together apparently with several European patient support groups. Janssen-Cilag,  a part of the  Johnson & Johnson family of companies, has since February 2009  been winning approval for its new premature ejaculation drug, dapoxetine (marketed in Europe as Priligy), in countries in Europe and around the world, but not yet in the United States. I’m a  fan of this drug, even though since I’m  a physician and sex therapist practicing in the United States I can’t yet prescribe it.  I was a medical advisor to Johnson & Johnson in 2005, when the company attempted unsuccessfully to gain FDA approval for the drug.  And I sincerely hope that the FDA will someday reconsider dapoxetine and allow the drug to be prescribed by US physicians.   Dapoxetine is conceptually not that new.  It’s a short-acting serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI), a member of the Prozac family.  We physicians in sexual medicine have prescribed SRI’s for years for men with prematurity, generally with good results. What’s new is that this is the...