Dr Snyder named to NYC Best Doctor list by New York Magazine

Dr Snyder named to NYC Best Doctor list by New York Magazine

    New York City Best Doctors, 2012 I was honored this week to be featured in New York Magazine’s June 11 issue as one of 1,160 best NYC physicians — and as one of only 31 New York City psychiatrists to make the cut. Listing as a New York Magazine Best Doctor has for many years been recognized as an important achievement in the New York medical world, and I’m grateful to have earned this recognition. I’m particularly honored to join on the list some distinguished colleagues in the field of sexual medicine, including two sex specialist urologists with whom I’ve often worked — Natan Bar-Chama and Ridwan Shabsigh — — and an impressive number of the urology faculty of Mount Sinai Mount School of Medicine — Michael Droller, Michael Gribetz,  Michael Palese, David Samadi, Jeffrey Stock, Jonathan Vapnek, and Department Chairman Simon Hall. — as well as many accomplished psychiatric colleague friends — such as Philip Bialer,  Harold Bronheim, Michael First, Alan Manevitz, Deborah Marin, Andy Roth, Jonathan Silver, and fellow sex therapist psychiatrist Virginia Sadock.   Yes, psychiatrists DO still talk to patients It’s well-known that there are fundamentally two different kinds of psychiatrists — the “pill kind” and the “talking kind.”  And it’s rumored that the latter are increasingly an endangered species. As a psychiatrist who is definitely more the “talking kind,”  I’m pleased that “talking psychiatry” is still acknowledged as having value.  Well, at least in New York City. Thanks as always to my colleagues and patients —  for your trust and encouragement every day.   Copyright © Stephen Snyder, MD 2012 www.sexualityresource.com New York City Follow Dr...
New York City Sex Therapy Diary:  The Other Side of Saturday Night

New York City Sex Therapy Diary: The Other Side of Saturday Night

Photo credit:  pedrosimoes7 via Creative Commons   Want to Test Your Knowledge of Male Sexual Psychology?   Take this quiz: QUIZ:  It’s Saturday night.  Paul, 25 years old, is on a date with a new woman whom he likes very much and finds very sexy.  Unfortunately, later that night when they undress together, he suddenly has no erection.  She is very understanding and kind, and tells him it’s OK. QUESTION:  What will Paul most likely do in this situation? A.  He’ll feel reassured, and they’ll go on to have a wonderful evening together. B.  He’ll go home very depressed and spend the rest of the night feverishly masturbating to prove to himself that he can still get hard. You all know the answer — it’s B, right?  Loss of an erection — what we call Erectile Dysfunction, or ED — in the presence of a new partner.  It’s one of the biggest psychological catastrophes that can happen to a young man. Despite over 20 years in the sexuality field, I’m not sure if I understand exactly why ED is so dramatic for men.  But it is.  Men’s partners often tell me that the worst part of living with a man with ED is dealing with his moods after an episode of erectile failure. When ED is due to psychological factors, it often occurs right before intercourse.  Which is another mystery.  The fact that a man’s erection should suddenly lose power in anticipation of intercourse is a source of confusion for women.  They worry that they’ve somehow turned the man off. Why would a man, or his penis, slam on the brakes in...
Some Open Secrets About Sexual Arousal

Some Open Secrets About Sexual Arousal

The secrets of sexual arousal are hidden in plain sight. You just have to know what you’re looking for. Physical sexual arousal – the sexually aroused body – has been endlessly studied, most famously by Masters and Johnson in the 1960’s. And less rigorously but no less intensely by every sexual couple since the dawn of human self-awareness. Most couples study the male partner’s erections and the female partner’s state of lubrication carefully, for reassurance about their respective states of sexual arousal.  Urban legends rise and fall concerning other putative guides to one’s partner’s level of sexual arousal (see “nipple erection,” “pupil dilation”). But through all of this, we’re in the realm of the sexually aroused body. The sexually aroused mind has proved harder to study. Research on mental sexual arousal continues to await its Masters and Johnson. In the meantime, when patients ask me how to recognize arousal, I tell them to look for the following signs:      Attention When we’re aroused, sex grabs our attention.  We stop thinking about bills, worries, responsibilities — our entire portfolio of ordinary concerns.  Our time sense typically becomes impaired. (People tend to arrive late to meetings when they’re aroused). If someone gave us an IQ test during peak sexual arousal, we wouldn’t do very well on it. The tester might have a difficult time getting us to pay attention to the questions. Good sex makes us definitely dumber. And great sex can make us downright stupid.    Regression Arousal reduces us to an infantile level. We become, if all goes well, as naturally selfish as a small child. We don’t tolerate frustration...